Event

Martina Cole in conversation with Henry Sutton

Friday 15 September
Thomas Paine Centre, UEA
8 - 9pm
£10 / £9 conc / £8 full-time student

The queen of gangland discusses her most recent novel, Damaged, and a phenomenal career encompassing over twenty novels, fourteen million sales and successful screen and stage adaptations. She’ll be talking with author and crime fiction senior lecturer Henry Sutton, who writes under the pseudonym Harry Brett. Also explore an exhibition of original manuscript material from key crime writers curated by the British Archive for Contemporary Writing, included in the ticket price. 

Don’t miss Arne Dahl’s exclusive lecture at UEA earlier the same evening!

About the writers

Martina Cole is the acknowledged queen of crime drama. Her most recent novel, The Good Life, was a No. 1 bestseller in the long line of No. 1 bestselling and phenomenally successful novels she has to her name. Several of Martina’s novels have been adapted for the screen, most recently The Take and The Runaway, which were shown on Sky One to remarkable reviews. In addition, Two Women and The Graft have been adapted for the stage; both were highly acclaimed when performed at the Theatre Royal Stratford East, which also staged Dangerous Lady in 2012, celebrating twenty years since Martina’s debut novel was published.

Martina Cole is a phenomenon. She continues to smash sales records with each of her books, which have sold in excess of fourteen million copies in total. In 2011 Martina surpassed the £50 million sales mark since records began and was the first British female novelist for adult audiences to achieve this. Website

Henry Sutton is the author of ten novels, including Time to Win (under the pseudonym Harry Brett), My Criminal World and Get Me Out Of Here. He also co-authored the DS Jack Frost novel, First Frost, under the pseudonym James Henry. His work has been translated into many languages. His fifth novel, Kids’ Stuff, received an Arts Council Writers’ Award in 2002, and became a long-running stage play in Riga, Latvia. In 2004, he won the J.B.Priestley Award. 

He has judged numerous literary prizes, including the John Lewellyn Rhys Prize and the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. He is the co-founder of the Noirwich crime festival and teaches Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, where he is a Senior Lecturer and the co-director of the MA Prose Fiction course and the director of the Creative Writing MA Crime Fiction. Website